ROOK

rook, Corvus frugilegus

(noun) common gregarious Old World bird about the size and color of the American crow

castle, rook

(noun) (chess) the piece that can move any number of unoccupied squares in a direction parallel to the sides of the chessboard

victimize, swindle, rook, goldbrick, nobble, diddle, bunco, defraud, scam, mulct, hornswoggle, short-change, con

(verb) deprive of by deceit; “He swindled me out of my inheritance”; “She defrauded the customers who trusted her”;

Source: WordNet® 3.1


Etymology 1

Noun

rook (plural rooks)

A European bird, Corvus frugilegus, of the crow family.

A cheat or swindler; someone who betrays.

(British) A type of firecracker used by farmers to scare birds of the same name.

A trick-taking game, usually played with a specialized deck of cards.

A bad deal, a rip-off.

Synonyms

• (swindler): swindler, cheat

Hypernyms

• (bird): bird

• (firecracker): firecracker

Verb

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

(transitive) To cheat or swindle.

Synonyms

• (cheat, swindle): cheat, con, do, dupe, have, swindle

Etymology 2

Noun

rook (plural rooks)

(chess) A piece shaped like a castle tower, that can be moved only up, down, left or right (but not diagonally) or in castling.

(rare) A castle or other fortification.

Synonyms

• (chesspiece): castle

• (castle): castle, fortress

Etymology 3

From rookie.

Noun

rook (plural rooks)

(baseball, slang) A rookie.

Etymology 4

Noun

rook (uncountable)

mist; fog; roke

Etymology 5

Verb

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

(obsolete) To squat; to ruck.

Etymology 6

Verb

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

Eye dialect spelling of look.

Anagrams

• Koro, Kroo, koro, kroo, roko

Source: Wiktionary


Rook, n.

Definition: Mist; fog. See Roke. [Obs.]

Rook, v. i.

Definition: To squat; to ruck. [Obs.] Shak.

Rook, n. Etym: [F. roc (cf. Sp. roque), fr. Per. & Ar. rokh, or rukh, the rook or castle at chess, also the bird roc (in this sense pehaps a different word); cf. Hind. rath a war chariot, the castle at chess, Skr. ratha a car, a war car. Cf. Roll.] (Chess)

Definition: One of the four pieces placed on the corner squares of the board; a castle.

Rook, n. Etym: [AS. hr; akin to OHG. hruoh, ruoh, ruoho, Icel. hr, Sw. roka, Dan. raage; cf. Goth. hrukjan to crow.]

1. (Zoöl.)

Definition: A European bird (Corvus frugilegus) resembling the crow, but smaller. It is black, with purple and violet reflections. The base of the beak and the region around it are covered with a rough, scabrous skin, which in old birds is whitish. It is gregarious in its habits. The name is also applied to related Asiatic species. The rook . . . should be treated as the farmer's friend. Pennant.

2. A trickish, rapacious fellow; a cheat; a sharper. Wycherley.

Rook, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Rooked; p. pr. & vb. n. Rooking.]

Definition: To cheat; to defraud by cheating. "A band of rooking officials." Milton.

Source: Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary 1913 Edition



RESET




Word of the Day

4 March 2021

AGNOSTIC

(noun) a person who claims that they cannot have true knowledge about the existence of God (but does not deny that God might exist)


coffee icon

Coffee Trivia

Some 16th-century Italian clergymen tried to ban coffee because they believed it to be “satanic.” However, Pope Clement VII loved coffee so much that he lifted the ban and had coffee baptized in 1600.

coffee icon