DUN

dun

(adjective) of a dull greyish brown to brownish grey color; “the dun and dreary prairie”

dun

(noun) horse of a dull brownish grey color

dun, greyish brown, grayish brown, fawn

(noun) a color or pigment varying around a light grey-brown color; “she wore dun”

dun

(verb) make a dun color

dun

(verb) cure by salting; “dun codfish”

dun

(verb) persistently ask for overdue payment; “The grocer dunned his customers every day by telephone”

torment, rag, bedevil, crucify, dun, frustrate

(verb) treat cruelly; “The children tormented the stuttering teacher”

Source: WordNet® 3.1


Etymology 1

Noun

dun (usually uncountable, plural duns)

A brownish grey colour.

Adjective

dun (not comparable)

Of a brownish grey colour.

Etymology 2

Noun

dun (plural duns)

(countable) A collector of debts.

An urgent request or demand of payment.

Verb

dun (third-person singular simple present duns, present participle dunning, simple past and past participle dunned)

(transitive) To ask or beset a debtor for payment.

(transitive) To harass by continually repeating e.g. a request.

Etymology 3

Uncertain; likely from the color.

Noun

dun (plural duns)

(countable) A newly hatched, immature mayfly; a mayfly subimago.

(countable, angling) A fly made to resemble the mayfly subimago.

Synonyms

• subimago

Etymology 4

Noun

dun (plural duns)

An ancient or medieval fortification; especially a hill-fort in Scotland or Ireland.

(archeology) A structure in the Orkney or Shetland islands or in Scotland consisting of a roundhouse surrounded by a circular wall; a broch.

Etymology 5

Verb

dun

(non-standard, informal) Eye dialect spelling of done: past participle of do

(non-standard, informal) Eye dialect spelling of don't: contraction of do + not.

Etymology 6

Likely from the color of fish so prepared.

Verb

dun (third-person singular simple present duns, present participle dunning, simple past and past participle dunned)

(transitive, dated) To cure, as codfish, by laying them, after salting, in a pile in a dark place, covered with saltgrass or a similar substance.

Etymology 7

Noun

dun (plural duns)

A mound or small hill.

Etymology 8

Imitative.

Interjection

dun

(humorous) Imitating suspenseful music.

Anagrams

• DNU, und

Proper noun

Dun

A river in Wiltshire and Berkshire, England, which flows into the River Kennet.

A river in Wiltshire and Hampshire, England, which flows into the River Test.

An alternative name for the River Don in Yorkshire, England.

A river in Antrim, Northern Ireland, alternatively named the Glendun River.

A settlement and parish in Angus council area, Scotland (OS grid ref NO6659).

Anagrams

• DNU, und

Source: Wiktionary


Dun, n. Etym: [See Dune.]

Definition: A mound or small hill.

Dun, v. t.

Definition: To cure, as codfish, in a particular manner, by laying them, after salting, in a pile in a dark place, covered with salt grass or some like substance.

Dun, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Dunned; p. pr. & vb. n. Dunning.] Etym: [AS. dyne noise, dynian to make a noise, or fr. Icel. dynr, duna, noise, thunder, duna to thunder; the same word as E. din. Din.]

Definition: To ask or beset, as a debtor, for payment; to urge importunately. Hath she sent so soon to dun Swift.

Dun, n.

1. One who duns; a dunner. To be pulled by the sleeve by some rascally dun. Arbuthnot.

2. An urgent request or demand of payment; as, he sent his debtor a dun.

Dun, a. Etym: [AS. dunn. of Celtic origin; cf. W. dwn, Ir. & Gael. donn.]

Definition: Of a dark color; of a color partaking of a brown and black; of a dull brown color; swarthy. Summer's dun cloud comes thundering up. Pierpont. Chill and dun Falls on the moor the brief November day. Keble. Dun crow (Zoöl.), the hooded crow; -- so called from its color; -- also called hoody, and hoddy.

– Dun diver (Zoöl.), the goosander or merganser.

Source: Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary 1913 Edition



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Word of the Day

8 December 2022

TRANSGRESSION

(noun) the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; “the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father”


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Coffee Trivia

Some 16th-century Italian clergymen tried to ban coffee because they believed it to be “satanic.” However, Pope Clement VII loved coffee so much that he lifted the ban and had coffee baptized in 1600.

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