CHAP

chap

(noun) (usually in the plural) leather leggings without a seat; joined by a belt; often have flared outer flaps; worn over trousers by cowboys to protect their legs

chap

(noun) a crack in a lip caused usually by cold

chap, fellow, feller, fella, lad, gent, blighter, cuss, bloke

(noun) a boy or man; “that chap is your host”; “there’s a fellow at the door”; “he’s a likable cuss”; “he’s a good bloke”

crevice, cranny, crack, fissure, chap

(noun) a long narrow depression in a surface

chap

(verb) crack due to dehydration; “My lips chap in this dry weather”

Source: WordNet® 3.1


Proper noun

CHAP

(computing) Initialism of Challenge-Handshake Authentication Protocol.

Anagrams

• CHPA, HCAP, PHAC, Pach

Etymology 1

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

(dated, outside, UK and Australia) A man, a fellow.

Synonym: Thesaurus:man

(UK, dialectal) A customer, a buyer.

(Southern US) A child.

Etymology 2

Verb

chap (third-person singular simple present chaps, present participle chapping, simple past and past participle chapped)

(intransitive) Of the skin, to split or flake due to cold weather or dryness.

(transitive) To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough.

(Scotland, northern England) To strike, knock.

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

A cleft, crack, or chink, as in the surface of the earth, or in the skin.

(obsolete) A division; a breach, as in a party.

(Scotland) A blow; a rap.

Etymology 3

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

(archaic, often, in the plural) The jaw.

One of the jaws or cheeks of a vice, etc.

Etymology 4

Shortening

Noun

chap (plural chaps)

(internet slang) Clipping of chapter.

Anagrams

• CHPA, HCAP, PHAC, Pach

Source: Wiktionary


Chap, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Chapped; p. pr. & vb. n. Chapping.] Etym: [See Chop to cut.]

1. To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough. Then would unbalanced heat licentious reign, Crack the dry hill, and chap the russet plain. Blackmore. Nor winter's blast chap her fair face. Lyly.

2. To strike; to beat. [Scot.]

Chap, v. i.

1. To crack or open in slits; as, the earth chaps; the hands chap.

2. To strike; to knock; to rap. [Scot.]

Chap, n. Etym: [From Chap, v. t. & i.]

1. A cleft, crack, or chink, as in the surface of the earth, or in the skin.

2. A division; a breach, as in a party. [Obs.] Many clefts and chaps in our council board. T. Fuller.

3. A blow; a rap. [Scot.]

Chap, n. Etym: [OE. chaft; of Scand. origin; cf. Icel kjaptr jaw, Sw. Käft, D. kiæft; akin to G. kiefer, and E. jowl. Cf. Chops.]

1. One of the jaws or the fleshy covering of a jaw; -- commonly in the plural, and used of animals, and colloquially of human beings. His chaps were all besmeared with crimson blood. Cowley. He unseamed him [Macdonald] from the nave to the chaps. Shak.

2. One of the jaws or cheeks of a vise, etc.

Chap, n. Etym: [Perh. abbreviated fr. chapman, but used in a more general sense; or cf. Dan. kiæft jaw, person, E. chap jaw.]

1. A buyer; a chapman. [Obs.] If you want to sell, here is your chap. Steele.

2. A man or boy; a youth; a fellow. [Colloq.]

Chap, v. i. Etym: [See Cheapen.]

Definition: To bargain; to buy. [Obs.]

Source: Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary 1913 Edition



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