YE

Proper noun

YE

Initialism of Young Earth, a form of creationism which proposes that the Earth is no more than a few thousand years old.

Anagrams

• -ey, ey

Proper noun

Ye

Anglicized version of the 42nd most common Chinese surname.

Anagrams

• -ey, ey

Etymology 1

Pronoun

ye personal pronoun

(archaic, outside, Northern England, Cornwall, Ireland, Newfoundland) You (the people being addressed).

(archaic) You, refers to one person addressed.

Usage notes

Ye was originally used only for the nominative case (as the subject), and only for the second-person plural. Later, ye was used as a subject or an object, either singular or plural, which is the way that you is used today. In modern Hiberno-English usage, ye is used as a subject or an object in the plural, to contrast with you (singular).

Synonyms

• (second-person plural): See Thesaurus:y'all

Verb

ye

(obsolete) Address a single person by the use of the pronoun ye instead of thou.

Synonyms

• (address by the pronoun ye): yeet (obsolete)

Antonyms

• (address by the pronoun ye): thou (obsolete)

Etymology 2

Article

ye

(archaic, definite) the

Etymology 3

Interjection

ye

(slang) Yes.

Etymology 4

Pronoun

ye (plural yes)

The Cyrillic Russian letter Е, е.

Anagrams

• -ey, ey

Source: Wiktionary



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Word of the Day

29 February 2024

INGENIOUSLY

(adverb) in an ingenious manner; “a Hampshire farmer had fowls of different breeds, including Dorkings, and he discriminated ingeniously between the ‘dark ones’ and the ‘white ones’”


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Coffee Trivia

The Boston Tea Party helped popularize coffee in America. The hefty tea tax imposed on the colonies in 1773 resulted in America switching from tea to coffee. In the lead up to the Revolutionary War, it became patriotic to sip java instead of tea. The Civil War made the drink more pervasive. Coffee helped energize tired troops, and drinking it became an expression of freedom.

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