GRAVE

dangerous, grave, grievous, serious, severe, life-threatening

(adjective) causing fear or anxiety by threatening great harm; “a dangerous operation”; “a grave situation”; “a grave illness”; “grievous bodily harm”; “a serious wound”; “a serious turn of events”; “a severe case of pneumonia”; “a life-threatening disease”

grave, grievous, heavy, weighty

(adjective) of great gravity or crucial import; requiring serious thought; “grave responsibilities”; “faced a grave decision in a time of crisis”; “a grievous fault”; “heavy matters of state”; “the weighty matters to be discussed at the peace conference”

grave, sedate, sober, solemn

(adjective) dignified and somber in manner or character and committed to keeping promises; “a grave God-fearing man”; “a quiet sedate nature”; “as sober as a judge”; “a solemn promise”; “the judge was solemn as he pronounced sentence”

grave, tomb

(noun) a place for the burial of a corpse (especially beneath the ground and marked by a tombstone); “he put flowers on his mother’s grave”

grave

(noun) death of a person; “he went to his grave without forgiving me”; “from cradle to grave”

scratch, engrave, grave, inscribe

(verb) carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface; “engrave a pen”; “engraved the trophy cup with the winner’s name”; “the lovers scratched their names into the bark of the tree”

sculpt, sculpture, grave

(verb) shape (a material like stone or wood) by whittling away at it; “She is sculpting the block of marble into an image of her husband”

Source: WordNet® 3.1


Etymology 1

Noun

grave (plural graves)

An excavation in the earth as a place of burial

Any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher.

(by extension) Death, destruction.

Etymology 2

Verb

grave (third-person singular simple present graves, present participle graving, simple past grove or graved, past participle graven or graved)

(transitive, obsolete) To dig.

(intransitive, obsolete) To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave.

(transitive, obsolete) To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture.

(intransitive, obsolete) To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly.

(transitive, obsolete) To entomb; to bury.

(intransitive, obsolete) To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving.

Etymology 3

Adjective

grave (comparative graver, superlative gravest)

Characterised by a dignified sense of seriousness; not cheerful. [from 16th c.]

Synonyms: sober, solemn, sombre, sedate, serious, staid

Low in pitch, tone etc. [from 17th c.]

Antonym: acute

Serious, in a negative sense; important, formidable. [from 19th c.]

Synonyms: serious, momentous, important

(obsolete) Influential, important; authoritative. [16th-18th c.]

Synonyms

• weightsome, sweer

• (unsorted by sense): sage, demure, thoughtful, weighty

Noun

grave (plural graves)

A written accent used in French, Italian, and other languages. è is an e with a grave accent (`).

Etymology 4

Noun

grave (plural graves)

(historical) A count, prefect, or person holding office.

Etymology 5

Verb

grave (third-person singular simple present graves, present participle graving, simple past and past participle graved)

(transitive, obsolete, nautical) To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc, and pay it over with pitch — so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose.

Anagrams

• Gaver

Proper noun

Grave (plural Graves)

A surname.

Statistics

• According to the 2010 United States Census, Grave is the 32599th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 705 individuals. Grave is most common among White (60.99%) and Hispanic/Latino (26.67%) individuals.

Anagrams

• Gaver

Source: Wiktionary


-grave.

Definition: A final syllable signifying a ruler, as in landgrave, margrave. See Margrave.

Grave, v. t.

Definition: (Naut.) To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch; -- so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose.

Grave, a. [Compar. Graver (grav"er); superl. Gravest.] Etym: [F., fr. L. gravis heavy; cf. It. & Sp. grave heavy, grave. See Grief.]

1. Of great weight; heavy; ponderous. [Obs.] His shield grave and great. Chapman.

2. Of importance; momentous; weighty; influential; sedate; serious; - - said of character, relations, etc.; as, grave deportment, character, influence, etc. Most potent, grave, and reverend seigniors. Shak. A grave and prudent law, full of moral equity. Milton.

3. Not light or gay; solemn; sober; plain; as, a grave color; a grave face.

4. (Mus.) (a) Not acute or sharp; low; deep; -- said of sound; as, a grave note or key. The thicker the cord or string, the more grave is the note or tone. Moore (Encyc. of Music).

(b) Slow and solemn in movement. Grave accent. (Pron.) See the Note under Accent, n., 2.

Syn.

– Solemn; sober; serious; sage; staid; demure; thoughtful; sedate; weighty; momentous; important.

– Grave, Sober, Serious, Solemn. Sober supposes the absence of all exhilaration of spirits, and is opposed to gay or flighty; as, sober thought. Serious implies considerateness or reflection, and is opposed to jocose or sportive; as, serious and important concerns. Grave denotes a state of mind, appearance, etc., which results from the pressure of weighty interests, and is opposed to hilarity of feeling or vivacity of manner; as, a qrave remark; qrave attire. Solemn is applied to a case in which gravity is carried to its highest point; as, a solemn admonition; a solemn promise.

Grave, v. t. [imp. Graved (gravd); p. p. Graven (grav"'n) or Graved; p. pr. & vb. n. Graving.] Etym: [AS. grafan to dig, grave, engrave; akin to OFries. greva, D. graven, G. graben, OHG. & Goth. graban, Dan. grabe, Sw. gräfva, Icel. grafa, but prob. not to Gr. gra`fein to write, E. graphic. Cf. Grave, n., Grove, n.]

1. To dig. [Obs.] Chaucer. He hath graven and digged up a pit. Ps. vii. 16 (Book of Common Prayer).

2. To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave. Thou shalt take two onyx stones, and grave on them the names of the children of Israel. Ex. xxviii. 9.

3. To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture; as, to grave an image. With gold men may the hearte grave. Chaucer.

4. To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly. O! may they graven in thy heart remain. Prior.

5. To entomb; to bury. [Obs.] Chaucer. Lie full low, graved in the hollow ground. Shak.

Grave, v. i.

Definition: To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving.

Grave, n. Etym: [AS. grf, fr. grafan to dig; akin to D. & OS. graf, G. grab, Icel. gröf, Russ. grob' grave, coffin. See Grave to carve.]

Definition: An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; also, any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher. Hence: Death; destruction. He bad lain in the grave four days. John xi. 17. Grave wax, adipocere.

Source: Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary 1913 Edition



RESET




Word of the Day

30 January 2023

MIDAZOLAM

(noun) an injectable form of benzodiazepine (trade name Versed) useful for sedation and for reducing pain during uncomfortable medical procedures


Do you know this game?

Wordscapes

Wordscapes is a popular word game consistently in the top charts of both Google Play Store and Apple App Store. The Android version has more than 10 million installs. This guide will help you get more coins in less than two minutes of playing the game. Continue reading Wordscapes: Get More Coins