BUG

microbe, bug, germ

(noun) a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use

bug

(noun) general term for any insect or similar creeping or crawling invertebrate

bug

(noun) a small hidden microphone; for listening secretly

bug, glitch

(noun) a fault or defect in a computer program, system, or machine

tease, badger, pester, bug, beleaguer

(verb) annoy persistently; “The children teased the boy because of his stammer”

wiretap, tap, intercept, bug

(verb) tap a telephone or telegraph wire to get information; “The FBI was tapping the phone line of the suspected spy”; “Is this hotel room bugged?”

Source: WordNet® 3.1


Etymology 1

Proper noun

Bug

A river flowing northwest 450 miles between Belarus and Poland.

A river in Ukraine, flowing 530 miles to the Dnieper estuary.

Etymology 2

Noun

Bug (plural Bugs)

(slang) A Volkswagen Beetle car.

Etymology 3

Noun

Bug (plural Bugs)

(slang) A Bugatti car.

Anagrams

• gub

Etymology

Noun

bug (plural bugs)

(entomology) An insect of the order Hemiptera (the “true bugs”).

Any of various species of marine or freshwater crustaceans; e.g. a Morton Bay bug, mudbug.

(colloquial) Any insect, arachnid, or other terrestrial arthropod that is a pest.

(colloquial, US) Any insect, arachnid, myriapod or entognath.

(chiefly, computing and engineering jargon) A problem that needs fixing.

Synonyms: defect, glitch

A contagious illness; a bacterium or virus causing it

(informal) An enthusiasm for something; an obsession

(informal) A keen enthusiast or hobbyist.

A concealed electronic eavesdropping or intercept device

A small and usually invisible file (traditionally a single-pixel image) on a World Wide Web page, primarily used to track users.

(broadcasting) A small, usually transparent or translucent image placed in a corner of a television program to indicate what network or cable channel is televising it

(aviation) A manually positioned marker in flight instruments.

A semi-automated telegraph key.

(obsolete) Hobgoblin, scarecrow; anything that terrifies. [late 14th c.–early 17th. c]

Synonyms: bog, bogey, bogle, boggle, boggard, bugbear

(chiefly, LGBT, "the bug") HIV.

(poker) A limited form of wild card in some variants of poker.

(paleontology, slang) A trilobite.

(petroleum industry, slang, dated) synonym of oil bug

(slang, horse-racing) A young apprentice jockey.

Usage notes

• Adjectives often applied to “bug”: major, minor, serious, critical, nasty, annoying, important, strange, stupid, flying, silly.

Synonyms

• See also defect

Verb

bug (third-person singular simple present bugs, present participle bugging, simple past and past participle bugged)

(informal, transitive) To annoy.

(transitive) To install an electronic listening device or devices in.

Synonyms

• See also annoy

Anagrams

• gub

Source: Wiktionary


Bug, n. Etym: [OE. bugge, fr. W. bwg, bwgan, hobgoblin, scarecrow, bugbear. Cf. Bogey, Boggle.]

1. A bugbear; anything which terrifies. [Obs.] Sir, spare your threats: The bug which you would fright me with I seek. Shak.

2. (Zoöl.)

Definition: A general name applied to various insects belonging to the Hemiptera; as, the squash bug; the chinch bug, etc.

3. (Zoöl.)

Definition: An insect of the genus Cimex, especially the bedbug (C. lectularius). See Bedbug.

4. (Zoöl.)

Definition: One of various species of Coleoptera; as, the ladybug; potato bug, etc.; loosely, any beetle.

5. (Zoöl.)

Definition: One of certain kinds of Crustacea; as, the sow bug; pill bug; bait bug; salve bug, etc.

Note: According to present popular usage in England, and among housekeepers in America, bug, when not joined with some qualifying word, is used specifically for bedbug. As a general term it is used very loosely in America, and was formerly used still more loosely in England. "God's rare workmanship in the ant, the poorest bug that creeps." Rogers (Naaman). "This bug with gilded wings." Pope. Bait bug. See under Bait.

– Bug word, swaggering or threatening language. [Obs.] Beau. & Fl.

Source: Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary 1913 Edition



RESET




Word of the Day

3 February 2023

KEEP

(verb) cause to continue in a certain state, position, or activity; e.g., ‘keep clean’; “hold in place”; “She always held herself as a lady”; “The students keep me on my toes”


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Coffee Trivia

“Coffee, the favorite drink of the civilized world.” – Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States

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